Facebook Friends With Your Co-Workers? Survey Shows Your Boss Probably Disapproves

You and your colleagues pitch in together on difficult projects, lunch together, and have drinks together after work. You probably think it’s the most natural thing in the world to friend them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter or Instagram. Your boss, though, probably thinks you shouldn’t.

That’s the surprising result of a survey of 1,006 employees and 307 senior managers conducted by staffing company OfficeTeam. Survey respondents were asked how appropriate it was to connect with co-workers on various social media platforms. It turns out that bosses and their employees have very different answers to this question.

When it comes to Facebook, 77 percent of employees thought it was either “very appropriate” or “somewhat appropriate” to be Facebook friends with your work colleagues, but only 49 percent of senior managers agreed. That disagreement carries over to other social media platforms. Sixty-one percent of employees thought it was fine to follow a co-worker on Twitter, but only 34 percent of bosses agreed. With Instagram, 56 percent of employees, but only 30 percent of bosses thought following a co-worker was appropriate. Interestingly, the one social platform bosses and employees seem to almost agree about is Snapchat, with 34 percent of employees thinking it was fine to connect with colleagues, and 26 percent of bosses thinking so too.

What should you do if you want to connect with a colleague on social media–if you get a connection request from a colleague? Here are a few options:

1. Use LinkedIn.

LinkedIn was not included in the OfficeTeam survey, but because it’s a professional networking tool, few bosses will object to you connecting with coworkers there. And LinkedIn has many of the same features as Facebook–you can even send instant messages to your contacts.

2. Keep your social media connections secret.

Most social networks give users the option to limit who can see what they post and who their other connections are. You can use this option to keep your social media interactions limited to the people you choose. If that doesn’t include your boss, he or she may never know that you and your co-workers are connected.

3. Talk to your boss.

He or she may not agree with the surveyed bosses who said connecting on social media was inappropriate, in which case there’s no problem. And if your boss does object, he or she may have some good reasons you hadn’t thought of to keep your professional life separate from your social media one. The only way to find out is to ask.

4. Consider the future.

It may be perfectly fine to connect with your co-workers on social media when you’re colleagues. But what happens if you get promoted to a leadership position? You may regret giving your former co-workers access to all the thoughts you share on Facebook or Twitter. So if a colleague sends you a social media request, or you want to make one yourself, take a moment to think it through. Will you be sorry one day–when you’re the boss yourself?

Tech

Facebook will help investigators release Russia ads, Sandberg tells Axios

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Facebook Inc (FB.O) Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg said on Thursday the company was fully committed to helping U.S. congressional investigators publicly release Russia-backed political ads that ran during the 2016 U.S. election.

“Things happened on our platform in this election that should not have happened,” Sandberg said during a interview in Washington with the Axios news website. “We told Congress and the intelligence committees that when they are ready to release the ads, we are ready to help them.”

The live interview was the first by a senior Facebook executive since the company disclosed last month it had found some 3,000 politically divisive ads believed to have been bought by Russia in the months before and after the presidential campaign.

The interview with Sandberg came during a multi-day visit to Washington that included meetings with U.S. lawmakers. On Wednesday, she met privately with the leaders of the House Intelligence Committee’s Russia investigation.

Sandberg’s outreach comes as the social media giant and other major internet firms, including Alphabet’s Google (GOOGL.O) and Twitter (TWTR.N), are on the defensive as they try to limit the fallout from a torrent of new revelations about how Moscow sought to use their platforms as vehicles to sow discord in the United States and to influence the election.

Sandberg told Axios the company began hearing rumors of Russian attempts to use the platform to spread propaganda around election day last November, but did not give a precise timeline about when the company began its review.

Sandberg said she supported the public release of those ads, and the pages they were connected to. Information about how the ads were targeted toward specific kinds of users would also be released, she said.

Asked if Facebook contributed to Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton’s defeat last year, Sandberg, an open Clinton supporter during the campaign, did not answer directly, but said it was important the website was “free from abuse” during any election in any country.

But Sandberg acknowledged the company had erred in how it handled the issue of foreign interference last year.

”It’s not just that we apologize. We’re angry, we’re upset. But what we really owe the American people is determination“ to do a better job of preventing foreign meddling,” she said.

“We don’t want this kind of foreign interference” on Facebook, Sandberg added. “Any time there is abuse on our platform, it troubles us. It troubles us deeply.”

She said the company had been too permissive at times in terms of how advertisers are allowed to target users, and that Facebook did not want to allow ads that may be “discriminatory.”

Still, Sandberg said it was important to protect “free expression” on Facebook. Had the Russian ads been bought by legitimate accounts instead of fraudulent ones, many would have been allowed to run on the site, she said.

She also criticized Twitter’s decision this week to remove a campaign video from Republican Representative Marsha Blackburn, who is running for Senate in Tennessee. Twitter took down the video, saying a remark Blackburn made about opposing abortion was inflammatory, but later recanted.

“In that ad, there are a lot of things that people don’t like, that I don’t like … But the question is, ‘Should divisive political or issue ads run?’ Our answer is yes, because when you cut off speech for one person you cut off speech for all people,” she said.

Sandberg said the company wanted other internet firms to work to make ad purchases more transparent, but said Facebook was still talking about the issue with lawmakers who want to introduce legislation on the topic.

Representatives from Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify about Russian influence at hearings before the Senate and House intelligence committees on Nov. 1.

Additional reporting by Makini Brice; Editing by Bernadette Baum

Tech

Facebook CSO responds to claim Wikileaks links to DNC emails were blocked

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The day after Wikileaks dumped more than 19,000 leaked emails from the Democratic National Committee, the organization claimed on Twitter that Facebook was censoring links to the material.

The Wikileaks website, notorious for hosting leaked government and corporate documents, released the haul Friday. The emails contain reams of correspondence between Democratic Party officials. They have made headlines for offering a behind-the-scenes look at the split between the DNC and former presidential hopeful, SenBernie Sanders.

On Saturday, people began to share screenshots on Twitter that appeared to show Facebook blocking certain links to the DNC email haul. The error messages said links had been “detected to be unsafe.” Read more…

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Facebook is open sourcing a hardware platform to deliver internet access to remote areas


Over the past few years, Facebook has been working on novel ways to connect the world to the Web – from delivering internet services using drones and lasers to offering free access to select sites via a controversial platform in developing countries. Its next foray in this endeavor is OpenCellular, a wireless access platform that supports a wide range of network platforms, including 2G, LTE and Wi-Fi access points. The idea is that its open source hardware and firmware can be deployed at a significantly lower cost than traditional network infrastructure, so that remote areas can be brought online more…

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EU tells Facebook and others to stop hate speech — because terrorism???

The European Union has told social platforms such as Facebook to do something about hate speech. And, yes, this is indeed something — something they’re already doing.

And does it surprise you to learn that this “code of conduct” is being justified in the name of combating terrorism? In IT Blogwatch, bloggers are ever so glad they won’t be subjected to hate speech any longer. Your humble blogwatcher curated these bloggy bits for your entertainment.

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Facebook Announces Sweeping Changes to Trending Section

Facebook is enacting a number of changes to its trending news module following a two-week internal investigation. The company’s announcement comes in response to a letter of inquiry from the US Senate Commerce Committee, issued one day after Gizmodo reported on the allegations of one former “news curator” for the trending section, who alleged coworkers regularly suppressed topics of interest to conservative readers.

Read more…


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Facebook kündigt WordPress-Plug-in für Instant Articles an

Vergleich zwischen Mobilversion (links) und Instant Article (Bild: Facebook)Entwickelt wurde die Erweiterung laut Facebooks Blogeintrag zusammen mit WordPress-Förderer und Hosting-Anbieter Automattic. Enthalten ist „eine Suite interaktiver Werkzeuge, …


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Facebook goes down and Twitter lights up

Facebook crashed for at least 10 minutes today and then struggled to fully come back online.

When users tried to open or refresh their Facebook pages a little after 12:30 p.m. ET today, they were greeted not with their news feed but with a largely blank screen that simply said, “Sorry, something went wrong. We’re working on it and we’ll get it fixed as soon as we can.”

The site began to come back online around 12:50 p.m., though some users reported still having trouble loading the site until about 1 p.m.

Facebook did not return a request for information on what caused the problem.

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Facebook is down, go do something more fun while it recovers [Update: It’s back!]

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Facebook is down for many users around the world, according to DownDetector.co.uk and reports on Twitter. It’s the second outage within a week for the social network, and many people are unable to log in and view those critical status messages, Pages and other updates. These problems don’t tend to last too long, but we’ve asked Facebook for a statement on the situation and will update here when normal service resumes. Until then, go fly a kite or something. Update: An intermittent service is coming back for some users but the site still isn’t back to normal. Some users are also still…

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Oculus unveils $99 Gear VR with Netflix, Facebook and Twitch Support

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In what is perhaps a long time coming for VR enthusiasts who have expressed faith in Oculus CEO Palmer Luckey’s vision for mainstream consumer hardware, the Facebook-acquired brand is finally putting it all together. Today at the keynote for Oculus Connect 2 in Hollywood, Samsung VP of Mobile Peter Koo announced a $ 99 Gear VR headset that will make use of Oculus technology and be ready in time for holiday shopping. The hardware will be compatible with all of Samsung’s Gear products, including the Note 5, S6 Edge+, S6, S6 Edge. Koo said it will be available to ship on Black Friday. The Gear…

This story continues at The Next Web


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Facebook Renames Its Controversial Internet.org App

Facebook Renames Its Controversial Internet.org App

Facebook is rebranding its most predominant—and controversial—effort to connect the unconnected.

The post Facebook Renames Its Controversial Internet.org App appeared first on WIRED.



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Facebook goes down for some users

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This story was updated at 1:05 p.m. ET.

Facebook went down for some users Thursday, but appears to be back up and running for others. The website “Is it Down Right Now?” lists Facebook as having “service disruptions.”

Visitors to Facebook.com were greeted by the message, “Sorry, something went wrong” instead of the usual Facebook homepage when visiting on the web, starting at about 12:30 p.m. Eastern Time on Thursday. Facebook’s mobile apps didn’t appear to be affected.

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Facebook’s app status dashboard shows a “major outage” beginning at approximately 12:30 p.m. ET. The service reports its key Facebook Graph API — the core software that apps use to read and write to Facebook — became unavailable at that time. Read more…

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